5G conversation booms at CES 2019

This year's Consumer Electronics Show (CES) just kicked off in Las Vegas, showcasing the latest future-looking trends in technology and beyond. The show features 4,500 exhibiting companies and welcomes more than 180,000 attendees from around the world. Some of the big product categories at CES this year include AI and robotics, self-driving technology, and digital money.

But driving much of this innovation seen at CES is 5G, which is the fifth-generation of wireless network that many have been saying is the big trend for 2019. 5G provides new performance details for users like a higher data rate, energy saving capabilities, faster speed, and lower latency. Cisco's Senior Vice Presiedent of the Enterprise Networking Business Anand Oswal writes that 5G is one of the technologies that will change networking in 2019.
"Consumers will be itching to get onboard with 5G in 2019, as carriers roll out limited installations that work on a small number of devices," writes Oswal, "Beyond 2019, 5G will bring improved speed and battery life to smartphones, as well as the growth of fixed wireless for residences, competing with wired broadband for some communities."
Mobile companies like Verizon are just starting to roll out 5G pilots, with the Motorola Moto Z3 becoming the inaugural 5G phone once Verizon turns on its mobile 5G service. Sprint also announced a plan for 5G smartphones on their network. The company plans to release Samsung 5G smartphone in the summer of 2019.
Cisco is taking the topic one step further. CTO of Service Provider Networking Michael Beesley will speak at CES about "6G and the Quantum Internet". 6G and the first quantum systems are believed to be arriving within the next ten years, meaning information will be delivered through quantum systems. Beesley will talk with a group of panelists about the next steps of this tech and the ultra-high-speed 6G.
Beyond the world of smartphones, 5G has the ability to transform various areas, like becoming an option as a wide-area network (WAN) connection for branch offices. The high speed and low latency of 5G can compete with wired connections. The fifth-generation communications tech could also change IoT applications, as one of 5G's key technologies is 'network slicing,' or being able to use a network on an as-a-service-basis. This could allow sensors to run on batteries that last for years.

Want more 5G? Check out Adopting Smart Operations to Scale in a 5G World.

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